Hope Mill Brimscombe Mill Brimscombe Port Port Mill Bourne Mill (1) Dark Mill Brimscombe Polytechnic Brimscombe House Gussage Mill Lewiston Mill Bourne Mill (2)
HB Brimscombe Polytechnic by kind permission of Howard Beard
What: School known locally as "Brimscombe Poly" (1888)
Where: Between the A419 and Brimscombe Port
Then: In 1910, 329 female and male students were enrolled. The main subjects were: woodwork, leatherwork, embroidery, art-needlework, arithmetic, bookkeeping, office routine, shorthand, typewriting, science, cabinet making, metalwork, mechanical engineering and ornamental ironwork
Now: After Thomas Keeble School opened in Eastcombe in 1962, the Brimscombe site closed and was sold to Benson Tool Works Ltd for re-development

Known locally as "Brimscombe Poly", this school began around 1888, at first and briefly in the Brimscombe Institute building, and then in the old canal warehouse building at Brimscombe Port. After extensive rebuilding it was officially reopened in 1911, by the Duchess of Beaufort.

In 1910, 329 students enrolled including both boys and girls. The main subjects taught were woodwork, leatherwork, embroidery, art-needlework, arithmetic, book-keeping, office routine, shorthand, typewriting, science, cabinet making, metalwork, mechanical engineering and ornamental ironwork.  At one time the needs of local industry were even catered for so specifically that the were classes in umbrella and walking stick making!

At a later date, the students moved to the School of Science & Art in Lansdown, Stroud, and the building at Brimscombe became a secondary school. Following the opening of the Thomas Keble School at Eastcombe in 1962, the Brimscombe site closed and was sold with the surrounding land for £13,000 to Bensons Tool Works Ltd, who had come down to the area from Birmingham in 1949. Bensons demolished the old buildings and built a new factory on the site.

From January 2016, this website is managed by Stroud Local History Society