Kimmins Mill Dudbridge House Sainsbury's Dudbridge Mill/Apperly Curtis/Redlers Site of Hawker's Dyeworks
GRO Sainsbury's IMG 0807
What: Historical industrial site
Where: GL5 3HG  Where Sainsbury's is now
Then: Home to the Dudbridge Patent Machine Works, steam and gas engine manufacture and the Hampton car assembly plant.
Now: Sainsbury's supermarket.

The most complex industrial site in Dudbridge. Part of the area was occupied by a small 19th century iron works, but much of the site was a walled garden and orchard up to 1900.

It was here that James Apperly established the Dudbridge Patent Machine Works to manufacture textile machinery, later continued by Cook & Vick. H.G. Holbrow began the manufacture of steam engines on another part of the site, and then J.D. Humpidge combined the two firms to form the Dudbridge Iron Works, which focused mainly on the manufacture of gas engines.

In the 1900s, Wesley Whitfield established an engineering company on part of the site, and between 1927 and 1931 Hampton Cars were assembled here.

Lewis & Hole were the last manufacturing company on the site. The firm was started in 1946 at Brimscombe Port and moved to Dudbridge in 1965. Their two cupola iron furnaces were well-known landmarks until demolished in 1996.

Sainsbury's supermarket was built in 1996-97, on the site of the Lewis & Hole foundry to designs by Hadfield Cawkwell Davidson of Sheffield. It was the site of national press and TV coverage when local resident Eileen Halliday (described as the Boadicea of Dudbridge), refused offers by Sainsbury's to purchase her cottage on the corner of the site to allow the access road to be built. She won her battle, and the road and car park were relocated.

Two 17th century doorways have been built into the wall of the supermarket. One, dated 1646, has the clothier's mark of Daniel Fowler, the other dates from the 1660s.

From January 2016, this website is managed by Stroud Local History Society

Revised 2018 EMW